High rate of unintended pregnancy among pregnant women in a maternity hospital in Cordoba, Argentina: a pilot study

High rate of unintended pregnancy among pregnant women in a maternity hospital in Cordoba, Argentina: a pilot study

Celina Palena, M. Valeria Bahamondes, Veronica Schenk, Luis Bahamondes and Julio Fernandez-Funes

Abstract (provisional)

Background

Although Argentina has a new law of Reproductive Health, many barriers continue existing to the provision of contraceptive methods at public healthcare facilities. Methods: This exploratory, descriptive pilot study evaluated 212 pregnant women selected at random at the Maternity and Neonatal Hospital, Cordoba, Argentina, who completed a structured questionnaire. The objectives were to determine the rate of unintended pregnancies, reasons for not using contraception, past history of contraceptive use, and intended future use. Results: Two hundred women responded the questionnaire. Forty percent of the participants stated that they had never used contraception and pregnancy was declared unintended by 65% of the interviewed women. In the unintended pregnancy group, almost 50% of women said that they had not been using a contraceptive method because they were “unaware about contraception”, and 25% stated that their contraceptive method had failed. Almost 85% of the women stated that they intended to use a contraceptive method after delivery. Conclusions: Approximately two-thirds of all pregnancies in this sample were unintended. Although the data is limited by the small sample size, our findings suggest that government needs to invest in counseling and in improving the availability and access to contraceptive methods.

The complete article is available as a provisional PDF.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: